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Immunisation against infectious disease

The Green Book has the latest information on vaccines and vaccination procedures, for vaccine preventable infectious diseases in the UK.

Health professionals and immunisation practitioners can keep up to date with developments in the field and updates to the Green Book through regular Vaccine Update newsletters.

It does not contain the latest chapter updates.

Check for updates to the Green Book: choose email or feed updates for future changes.

Recommendations not yet incorporated into the Green Book.

  1. Revised recommendations for administering more than 1 live vaccine
    • 24 April 2015
    • Guidance

The Green Book

Information for public health professionals on immunisation.

  1. Immunisation against infectious disease: the green book front cover and contents page
    • 17 December 2013
    • Guidance

Part 1: principles, practices and procedures

Information for public health professionals on immunisation.

  1. Immunity and how vaccines work: the green book, chapter 1
    • 19 March 2013
    • Guidance
  2. Consent: the green book, chapter 2
    • 19 March 2013
    • Guidance
  3. Storage, distribution and disposal of vaccines: the green book, chapter 3
    • 19 March 2013
    • Guidance
  4. Immunisation procedures: the green book, chapter 4
    • 20 March 2013
    • Guidance
  5. Immunisation by nurses and other health professionals: the green book, chapter 5
    • 20 March 2013
    • Guidance
  6. Contraindications and special considerations: the green book, chapter 6
    • 26 October 2017
    • Guidance
  7. Immunisation of individuals with underlying medical conditions: the green book, chapter 7
    • 29 September 2016
    • Guidance
  8. Vaccine safety and adverse events following immunisation: the green book, chapter 8
    • 20 March 2013
    • Guidance
  9. Surveillance and monitoring for vaccine safety: the green book, chapter 9
    • 20 March 2013
    • Guidance
  10. Vaccine Damage Payment Scheme: the green book, chapter 10
    • 10 June 2014
    • Guidance
  11. UK immunisation schedule: the green book, chapter 11
    • 20 September 2016
    • Guidance
  12. Immunisation of healthcare and laboratory staff: the green book, chapter 12
    • 20 March 2013
    • Guidance

Part 2: the diseases, vaccinations and vaccines

Information for public health professionals on immunisation.

  1. Anthrax: the green book, chapter 13
    • 21 February 2017
    • Guidance
  2. Cholera: the green book, chapter 14
    • 11 December 2013
    • Guidance
  3. Diphtheria: the green book, chapter 15
    • 19 April 2013
    • Guidance
  4. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib): the green book, chapter 16
    • 19 April 2013
    • Guidance
  5. Hepatitis A: the green book, chapter 17
    • 4 December 2013
    • Guidance
  6. Hepatitis B: the green book, chapter 18
    • 17 July 2017
    • Guidance
  7. Human papillomavirus (HPV): the green book, chapter 18a
    • 5 June 2014
    • Guidance
  8. Influenza: the green book, chapter 19
    • 15 August 2018
    • Guidance
  9. Japanese encephalitis: the green book, chapter 20
    • 11 June 2018
    • Guidance
  10. Measles: the green book, chapter 21
    • 1 July 2013
    • Guidance
  11. Meningococcal: the green book, chapter 22
    • 20 September 2016
    • Guidance
  12. Mumps: the green book, chapter 23
    • 4 April 2013
    • Guidance
  13. Pertussis: the green book, chapter 24
    • 7 April 2016
    • Guidance
  14. Pneumococcal: the green book, chapter 25
    • 16 January 2018
    • Guidance
  15. Polio: the green book, chapter 26
    • 19 April 2013
    • Guidance
  16. Rabies: the green book, chapter 27
    • 10 July 2018
    • Guidance
  17. Respiratory syncytial virus: the green book, chapter 27a
    • 4 September 2015
    • Guidance
  18. Rotavirus: the green book, chapter 27b
    • 28 August 2015
    • Guidance
  19. Rubella: the green book, chapter 28
    • 4 April 2013
    • Guidance
  20. Shingles (herpes zoster): the green book, chapter 28a
    • 26 February 2016
    • Guidance
  21. Smallpox and vaccinia: the green book, chapter 29
    • 20 March 2013
    • Guidance
  22. Tetanus: the green book, chapter 30
    • 2 August 2018
    • Guidance
  23. Tick-borne encephalitis: the green book, chapter 31
    • 19 April 2013
    • Guidance
  24. Tuberculosis: the green book, chapter 32
    • 3 August 2018
    • Guidance
  25. Typhoid: the green book, chapter 33
    • 28 August 2015
    • Guidance
  26. Varicella: the green book, chapter 34
    • 9 August 2018
    • Guidance
  27. Yellow fever: the green book, chapter 35
    • 14 June 2018
    • Guidance
  1. 2 September 2014 Added Revised recommendations for administering more than 1 live vaccine’.
  2. 18 March 2014 Added link to PHE publications page filtered for Green Book updates.
  3. 11 September 2013 First published.

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The Green Book: appraisal and evaluation in central government

HM Treasury guidance on how to appraise and evaluate policies, projects and programmes.

The Green Book

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Green Book Supplementary Guidance: Discount Factors

MS Excel Spreadsheet , 60.6KB

Green Book Supplementary Guidance: Appraisal Summary Table

MS Excel Spreadsheet , 47.9KB

Public sector business cases using the five case model: guidance

Public sector business cases using the five case model: templates

This file is in an OpenDocument format

Access to training and accreditation in best practice business cases

Checklist for assessing business cases

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A short ‘plain English’ guide to assessing business cases

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Agile digital and IT projects: clarification of business case guidance

Social Discount Rates for Cost-Benefit Analysis: A Report for HM Treasury

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The Green Book is guidance issued by HM Treasury on how to appraise policies, programmes and projects. It also provides guidance on the design and use of monitoring and evaluation before, during and after implementation.

There is a wide range of supplementary Green Book guidance giving more information on particular issues and on applying the Green Book in specific contexts – for example, valuing environmental effects and assessing competition effects. These are:

Spending proposals and business cases

All public spending proposals should be accompanied by a properly developed and structured business case using the Treasury ‘five case model’ and the supplementary Green Book guidance on development and assessment of business cases.

Regulatory proposals and impact assessments

Regulatory impact assessment is usually required for all proposed UK government regulatory changes.

The appraisal of value needed to ascertain the effects of the proposal is sometimes referred to as the impact of the proposal and is conducted according to Green Book guidance.

The decision process for progressing regulatory proposals is subject to guidance from the Better Regulation Executive (BRE) of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills who are responsible for the Impact Assessment process (templates, guidance etc).

Social Discount Rates for Cost-Benefit Analysis: A Report for HM Treasury

This document summarises the key theoretical and empirical evidence on social discounting that has emerged since the Green Book of 2003.

The views displayed in this document are those of the authors and do not reflect those of HM Treasury.

Previous editions of the Green Book

The previous 2003 edition of Green Book guidance is now withdrawn. For purposes of academic study and public information it may be found on the National Archives website.

  1. 6 March 2018 New version of the Green Book published, as well as accompanying academic paper.
  2. 11 November 2016 Link to new guidance on Treasury approvals for programmes and projects added.
  3. 20 October 2015 Updated better business cases guidance published
  4. 19 November 2014 updated ‘Access to training and accreditation in best practice business cases’ publication
  5. 6 August 2014 Public sector business cases using the five case model: templates file (.doc) replaced (with (.odt)
  6. 11 April 2014 ‘Agile digital and IT projects: clarification of business case guidance’ published
  7. 4 February 2014 Updated guidance on public sector business cases using the ‘five case model’ published
  8. 18 April 2013 First published.


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Government efficiency, transparency and accountability

Openness and transparency can save money, strengthen people’s trust in government and encourage greater public participation in decision-making.

Government spending

How the government is working to spend public money responsibly and effectively.

Collection

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Support links

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Zurich Film Festival Sets ‘Green Book’ For Opening Night – Variety

August 24, 2018 2:18AM PT

Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” is set to be the opening night film for the 14th Zurich Film Festival, the festival announced Friday. The drama, which stars Viggo Mortensen and Oscar-winner Mahershala Ali, will see its European Premiere in Zurich on Sept. 27.

Set in the early 1960s, “Green Book” is inspired by the true story of a friendship that transcended race, class and societal constraints. Mortensen plays an Italian-American bouncer from the Bronx, hired to drive a world-class black pianist (played by “Moonlight’s” Ali) on a concert tour from Manhattan to the Deep South. The pair must rely on “The Green Book,” a guide to the few establishments that were safe and accessible for African-Americans. Linda Cardellini co-stars.

“Whilst it is set in the 1960s, ‘Green Book’ feels incredibly relevant today, in the face of racism, discrimination and division in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world,” said Zurich Film Festival co-directors Nadja Schildknecht and Karl Spoerri. “The film is also a pure delight for cinema-goers.”

Farrelly and Mortensen are both expected to attend the opening night premiere in Zurich. “Green Book” will have its world premiere at the Toronto Intl. Film Festival in September.

The Participant Media and DreamWorks Pictures film was written by Farrelly, Brian Currie and Nick Vallelonga. All three serve as producers alongside Jim Burke and Charles B. Wesller. Octavia Spencer and Kwame L. Parker serve as executive producers, alongside Jeff Skoll and Jonathan King for Participant Media, and John Sloss and Steven Farneth for Cinetic Media.

The 14th Zurich Film Festival runs Sept. 27-Oct. 7.

Deadpool 2

The world’s most unconventional superhero returns to battle ninjas and metal men in the highly-anticipated sequel to Deadpool. Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is back and this time he’s got a whole new set of problems. Not only is he struggling to get to grips with life in an open relationship, but also finds himself battling a variety of new villains who range from ninjas to metal men.

Luckily, it’s not all doom and gloom for our loveable hero, as he’s managed to acquire a shiny new Hello Kitty backpack and the highly-coveted title of World’s Best 4th Wall Breaking Superhero.

Welcome back Deadpool, the world has been waiting.

The original Deadpool took in over £550m at the global box office back in 2016, proving the time was right for a new breed of superhero. Full plot details of the sequel are being kept under wraps for the time being, however Ryan Reynolds (The Hitman’s Bodyguard), Morena Baccarin (The Flash) and T.J. Miller (The Emoji Movie) return. Josh Brolin (Avengers: Infinity War) has also joined the cast in the dual role of Nathan Summers and Cable.

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Clip – Meet Cable

Deadpool 2 – Trailer

Deadpool 2 – ‘Wet On Wet’ Teaser Trailer

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But Did You Read the Book?

Cara Delevingne, Press Junketry, and Me

Earlier this week, an interview with the actor Cara Delevingne made the rounds online. In it, the anchors of “Good Day Sacramento” refer to her as “Carla” and then ask her whether she read the novel Paper Towns. (She stars in the film adaptation.)

The interview goes downhill from there, with the interviewers suggesting that she is tired, and that she is not adequately excited about the opportunity to be on Good Day Sacramento, which is the #1 morning show in literally all of Sacramento, and then they tell her to take a nap and cut the interview short.

I am friends with Cara, and the author of the book in question. I spent more than a month with her on tour in Europe and the U.S., and I watched as again and again, she was asked this question. Cara has read the book (multiple times), but the question is annoying — not least because her male costar, Nat Wolff, was almost always asked when he’d read the book, while Cara was almost always asked if she’d read it.

In the past two months, I’ve done something like 300 on-camera interviews. As you get asked the same questions again and again, you develop rote responses as a way of protecting yourself. The rote responses are true — the cast really was like a family; we really are all still friends — but in the repetition, the answers start to feel less and less honest.

For example, I was asked in most interviews how involved I was in the film, and I told the truth, which is that I did basically nothing and sat around all day eating Cheetos and telling everyone they were doing a good job. And then Nat would jump in and say, “John’s being modest. His understanding of the story and characters were vital to us.” But because we were reciting lines more than answering questions, the answer started to feel dishonest to me. At one point between interviews, I said to Nat, “I can’t remember if I even like Cheetos.” And he said, “That’s okay, man. I can’t remember if your understanding of the story was vital to us.”

Look, these are obviously the first worldiest of first world problems, but the whole process of commodifying personhood to sell movie tickets is inherently dehumanizing. The TV people want some part of you, and in exchange for it, they will put the name of your movie on TV. But in that process, you do lose something of your self. (For the record, I don’t get the feeling that the journalists asking the same questions over and over particularly savor the experience, either. But they need their sit-down interview, and we need our publicity, and so the wheel spins on.)

There are bigger problems in the world — in fact, almost every problem in the world is bigger — but if people are going to pay attention to these junket interviews and criticize Cara for responding flippantly to a stupid question, I think context might be helpful.

I was lucky to share most of my interviews with Nat, one of my closest and most trusted friends, and to learn from him how to deal with uncomfortable questions. (For instance, when asked is X a good kisser, or is X is a better kisser than Y, Nat gently explains that he doesn’t answer questions about kissing, because the women he works with should be talked about for their performances in the film not for their kissing.) But I never really got good at junketry. I just sort of gave up.

Like, there’s a line in the beginning of the novel: “Everyone gets a miracle.” The male narrator of the story believes his miracle is Margo Roth Spiegelman, the character Cara plays in the movie. Later in the book, the boy realizes that Margo is not a miracle, that she is just a person, and that his imagining her as a miracle has been terribly hurtful to them both. But still, I was asked over a hundred times, “Who’s your miracle?” At first, I tried to fight it, tried to argue that we must see people as people, that we must learn to imagine them complexly instead of idealizing them, that the romantic male gaze is limiting and destructive to women. That’s the whole point of the story to me.

But eventually, I just started to say, “My miracle is my wife.” (And then Nat would deadpan, “My miracle is also John’s wife. She’s great.”) In the end, rather than fight, I stuck to the script.

Cara, however, refuses to stick to the script. She refuses to indulge lazy questions and refuses to turn herself into an automaton to get through long days of junketry. I don’t find that behavior entitled or haughty. I find it admirable. Cara Delevingne doesn’t exist to feed your narrative or your news feed — and that’s precisely why she’s so fucking interesting.

From a quick cheer to a standing ovation, clap to show how much you enjoyed this story.

John Green

I write books, including Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars. (Books are like tweets, except longer.) I also make videos with my brother.

The Spy Who Dumped Me

The Spy Who Dumped Me

Disney’s Christopher Robin

Disney’s Christopher Robin

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Find out what’s on at Vue Bristol Longwell Green. Enjoy the latest 2D and 3D film releases in premium Sony 4K picture quality and Digital Dolby surround sound across 13 screens and 2,686 seats. Plus, experience Big Screen Events including theatre, opera, dance, sport, and music performances from around the world.

Watch film trailers, browse listings, and book your tickets online for your local Vue. Find out about special showings, such as Mini Mornings with the kids, and check out the latest information on cinema deals near you. Get inspired with Inside Vue where you can catch film news and reviews.

If you’re travelling by car or public transport, find directions to Vue Bristol Longwell Green. Read Bristol Longwell Green accessibility information for everything you need to know about location, venue, and screen access.

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Vue Bristol Longwell Green

Getting here

Located at Longwell Green, Vue Bristol Longwell Green is located on the Avon Ring Road and is easily accessible by car on the A4174 from the south east outskirts of Bristol. Free parking is available at the venue.

By public transport

Located at Longwell Green, Vue Bristol Longwell Green has 13 screens with approximately 2,686 seats.

This venue opens approximately 15 minutes before the first film of the day.

Screen 1 : 365 seats
Screen 2 : 153 seats
Screen 3 : 111 seats
Screen 4 : 111 seats
Screen 5 : 153 seats
Screen 6 : 276 seats (Digital 3D and 35mm)
Screen 7 : 320 seats
Screen 8 : 279 seats
Screen 9 : 153 seats
Screen 10 : 111 seats
Screen 11 : 111 seats
Screen 12 : 153 seats
Screen 13 : 368 seats

All screens are fitted with Digital Dolby 6.1 Surround Sound

Accessibility

Vue is dedicated to giving each and every one of our guests an exceptional big screen experience. Below, you’ll find accessibility information for Vue Bristol Longwell Green, including details on accessible and autism-friendly screenings. We welcome assistance dogs into all our venues.

If you’d like any more information, give our customer services team a call on 0345 308 4620*. You can also ask a member of our staff during your visit.

Location access

Vue Bristol Longwell Green is located on the ground floor of the leisure park, around 100 metres from the nearest bus stop outside McDonalds. There’s a car park surrounding the venue with 32 spaces available for blue badge holders.

Venue and screen access

Vue Bristol Longwell Green has wheelchair access throughout the venue and in all screens. Access to the venue is through three sets of double doors and one automatic single door. Screens are all one level. There’s step-free access to the wheelchair spaces and adjoining seats, and accessible toilets near screen six.

Purchasing tickets

There are hearing loops at all of the counters, where food, drinks and tickets can be purchased, and pre-purchased tickets can be collected. There is also a lowered counter available. You can also purchase or collect tickets at the automatic ticket machines located in the venue foyer.

If you’d like to purchase tickets using the CEA card, you can do so in person at the venue, online or by calling customer services on 0345 308 4620 (local rates apply).

Accessible screenings

Vue Bristol Longwell Green shows subtitled (ST) films every week. Film times are updated each Wednesday morning for the coming Friday. You can book subtitled screenings here.

Select All Times or Coming Soon to see the full range of screenings available.

We also offer audio description (AD) on a selection of the films. You can book audio description screenings here. If you’d rather book by phone, give us a call on 0345 308 4620 (local rates apply).

Some of our screens are equipped with infrared technology to provide hearing assistance. Simply let a member of our staff know when you’re purchasing your tickets and they’ll organise a headset or neck loop for you. We recommend arriving a little earlier than you normally would so we can get you set up in time for the film.

Autism-friendly screenings

In our autism-friendly screenings, the lights are left on low, the sound is turned down and trailers and adverts aren’t played. When you book tickets for an autism-friendly screening, you’ll be asked to choose allocated seats but we do encourage guests to move around during the screening and make a bit of noise.

Vue Bristol Longwell Green hosts an autism-friendly screening at 10am on the last Sunday of every month. You can book autism-friendly screenings here. Select All Times or Coming Soon to see the full range of screenings available.

Anne of Green Gables Series

This is the chronological reading order for the series.

Before Green Gables is the story of Anne Shirley’s life before her arrival at Green Gables-a heartwarming tale of a precocious child whose lively imagination and relentless spirit help her to overcome difficult circumstances and of a young girl’s ability to love, learn, and above all, dream.

Published in 1908, L. M. Montgomery’s coming-of-age classic Anne of Green Gables has enchanted generations of readers, both children, and adults. The story of the spunky red-haired orphan from Prince Edward Island is known to millions, and copies of the eight titles in the series have never gone out of print.

But when readers first meet Anne, she is eleven and has just been sent from an orphanage to meet her new family. No one ever learned the events of Anne’s life before she arrived at Green Gables.

Shelve Before Green Gables

Shelve Anne of Green Gables

A new life means fresh problems to solve, fresh surprises. Anne and Gilbert will make new friends and meet their neighbors: Captain Jim, the lighthouse attendant, with his sad stories of the sea; Miss Cornelia Bryant, the lady who speaks from the heart — and speaks her mind; and the tragically beautiful Leslie Moore, into whose dark life Anne shines a brilliant light.

The original, unabridged text

A specially commissioned biography of L. M. Montgomery

Anne of Green Gables
\u201cShe’ll have to go back.\u201d
The Cuthberts of Green Gables had decided to adopt an orphan\u2014a nice sturdy boy to help Matthew with the farm chores. The orphanage sent a girl instead\u2014a mischievous, talkative redhead who’d be no use at all. She would just have to go back. But the longer Anne was there, the more no one could image Green Gable without her.

Anne of Avonlea
The Girl from Green Gables
It seemed only yesterday that the skinny, freckled redhead had first come to the Island. Now here was Anne, at pretty sixteen, teaching at the Avonlea school and all grown up. Well, not quite grown up. In fact, Anne was not very different from her restless young pupils\u2014mischievous and spirited as ever.

Anne of the Island
\u201cHow Horrible it is That People Have to Grow Up!\u201d
Wishing couldn’t keep Anne of Green Gables from growing up. Anne’s whole world was changing\u2014her childhood friends marrying, Anne herself leaving the Island for four years of college. But as much as life changed, important things stayed the same\u2014especially spirited, irrepressible Anne.

Anne of Green Gables (1908)
Anne of Avonlea (1909)
Anne of the Island (1915)
Anne of Windy Poplars (1936)
Anne’s House of Dreams (1917)
Anne of Ingleside (1939)
Rainbow Valley (1919)
Rilla of Ingleside (1921)
Chronicles of Avonlea (1912)
Further Chronicles of Avonlea (1920)”>,”seriesPosition”:”1-8 + chronicles”,”textReviewsCount”:20,”publicationDate”:”1915″,”toBePublished”:false,”editions”:”13 editions”,”editionsUrl”:”/work/editions/32814971-anne-the-green-gables-complete-collection-all-10-anne-books”>]>”>


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