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‘Toy Story 4’ Delayed Again, ‘The Incredibles 2’ Moved Up

Posted on Wednesday, October 26th, 2016 by Peter Sciretta

Two Pixar films are swapping release dates. Disney has announced that Toy Story 4 has been delayed again, and will be replaced with The Incredibles 2 in the June 2018 release slot. Why is Toy Story 4 delayed? Learn more, after the jump.

The Incredibles 2 will now hit theaters on June 15th, 2018 while Toy Story 4 will now be released on June 21st, 2019. Disney insiders are saying that the two films are swapping dates “thanks to an accelerated production schedule for Incredibles 2.” However, I personally heard rumblings a few months back to that Pixar was having a little trouble with the production of Toy Story 4, which could be the reason for the delay.

We don’t know much about either project, but we have learned more information about the fourth Toy Story film over the years. We know that John Lasseter, director of the original Toy Story and Toy Story 2, is directing the film, which is set to open a new chapter in the lives of Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and the Toy Story gang.

The story which was dreamt up by Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter and Lee Unkrich, is supposedly focused on a love story, that finds Woody searching for his lost love Bo-Peep, who vanished in between the second and third films. The movie is being co-directed by Josh Cooley, director of the Inside Out short film Riley’s First Date? The film is written by Rashida Jones and Will McCormack.

“We love these characters so much; they are like family to us,” said Lasseter. “We don’t want to do anything with them unless it lives up to or surpasses what’s gone before. Toy Story 3 ended Woody and Buzz’s story with Andy so perfectly that for a long time, we never even talked about doing another Toy Story movie. But when Andrew, Pete, Lee and I came up with this new idea, I just could not stop thinking about it. It was so exciting to me, I knew we had to make this movie—and I wanted to direct it myself.”

This isn’t the first time Toy Story 4 has been delayed. The project was initially announced for a June 17th 2017 release, but last year around this same time, swapped dates with Cars 3. Seems like October is the time when Disney and Pixar execs evaluate their upcoming June releases and make the big decisions. It probably doesn’t help that John Lasseter is splitting his time running the animation studio and Walt Disney Animation while directing this new film.

As for The Incredibles 2, director Brad Bird has been unwilling to reveal any story details.

“It’ll be more Incredibles. I’m not going to give up anything! I come down on the side of surprise,” says Brad Bird.

He most recently teased that the sequel will take the franchise “in some new directions.”

Here is the Pixar release calendar as it stands now:

Cars 3 – June 16, 2017
Coco – November 22, 2017
The Incredibles 2 – June 15, 2018
Toy Story 4 – June 21, 2019
Untitled Pixar Project 1 – March 13, 2020
Untitled Pixar Project 2 – June 19, 2020

According to Pixar president Jim Morris, both untitled projects are stories based on original ideas, not sequels, remakes or adaptations.

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Toy Story 4

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Toy Story 4 is an upcoming Pixar film. It will be the third sequel to Pixar’s first feature Toy Story. The film will be released in theaters on June 21, 2019.” [2] The film was officially announced by Walt Disney CEO Bob Iger during a meeting for investors on November 6, 2014, with an original release date of June 16, 2017, [3] before later being pushed to 2018 after Cars 3 took its place. Then it was pushed again after Incredibles 2 switched release dates. [2] While originally set to be directed by John Lasseter and produced by Galyn Susman, it is now being directed by Josh Cooley and produced by Jonas Rivera [4] . [5] [6] Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, and Lee Unkrich were involved in the conception of the story. The script was going to be written by Rashida Jones and Will McCormack, however, they later left the project because of “philosophical differences” with Pixar. [7] [8] On January 18, 2018, it was announced that Stephany Folsom would write the script for the film. [9]

Sometime after being given to their new owner Bonnie Anderson, Woody and his friends go on an adventure to find Bo Peep and bring her to Bonnie’s House.

Production

Lasseter said regarding this film: [7]

The film is described as a “new chapter in the lives of Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and the Toy Story gang.” [7] Lasseter has stated the film is a love story between Woody and Bo Peep, and picks up where Toy Story 3 left. [10] [5]

In an interview with the official Disney Latino blog, Jim Morris said Toy Story 4 would not be a continuation of the previous trilogy, stating: [11] [12] [13]

Lasseter himself reiterated this point at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, saying: “I am very excited to be directing again. We’re in the early stages of the film, but it’s shaping up nicely. It’s funny. The story is not as much a continuation of the past films, but a brand new chapter in the Toy Story world.” [14]

The Los Angeles Times stated Lasseter and Stanton have worked on writing a treatment since 2012. [5] According to Variety, Lasseter kept work on the sequel a secret, even from the studio presidents Jim Morris and Ed Catmull, until Stanton had finished a treatment. [15]

In November 2015, Tom Hanks indicated that he was in the process of recording his lines as Woody. [16] Don Rickles had confirmed that he would return as Mr. Potato Head for the sequel, [17] but passed away due to kidney failure on April 6, 2017, [18] and was unable to record dialogue for the film as the script was still being written around the time of his death. [19] . It is uncertain how this will affect Potato Head’s role in the film. Kristen Schaal has confirmed she will return as Trixie. [20] Laurie Metcalf, the voice of Ms. Davis, has indicated that she will return as well. [21]

Toy Story 4

Toy Story 4

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Official Synopsis

Woody, Buzz, and the rest of the gang are coming back to a theater near you!! The film is described as a “new chapter in the lives of Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and the Toy Story gang.” According to the Los Angeles Times, Lasseter has stated the film is a love story, and picks up where Toy Story 3 left off. “Pixar to make ‘Toy Story 4’: Why Lasseter is returning to direct”. www.latimes.com, November 6, 2014 Further details of the movie plot were exposed during D23 2015 when John Lasseter announced to ABC News that “Toy Story 4 will be a love story between Woody and Bo Peep”. John Lasseter provided further details by revealing that Woody and Buzz are on an epic journey to find Bo Peep.

The movie is to take place nine years after Toy Story 3.

In March 2015, Pixar president Jim Morris stated that he does not think the film will be a continuation of the third film, but will instead be a stand-alone sequel. The news is validated by Lasseter confirming that it will be a “brand new chapter in the Toy Story‘s world”.

  • Tom Hanks as Woody
  • Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear
  • Joan Cusack as Jessie
  • Annie Potts as Bo Peep
  • Blake Clark as Slinky Dog
  • Wallace Shawn as Rex
  • John Ratzenberger as Hamm
  • TBA as Mr. Potato Head
  • Estelle Harris as Mrs. Potato Head[2]
  • Jodi Benson as Barbie[3]
  • Bonnie Hunt as Dolly[4]
  • Patricia Arquette as TBA [5]

Production

Lee Unkrich has said in many interviews that Pixar currently does not have any plans to make a Toy Story 4, and that the purpose of Toy Story 3 was to bring the story of the toys and their relationship with Andy to a phenomenal end. He thinks it’s great that people want to see another Toy Story film, but Pixar will for now focus on other stories. He has said however that Pixar will try to find various ways to keep the characters alive, as seen in the Toy Story Toons series and Toy Story of Terror! and Toy Story That Time Forgot that there may be a Toy Story 4 in the future, but they don’t have any plans for it right now. In July 2010, Tim Allen has signed on to reprise his role for a fourth feature-length film, but this does not necessarily mean that a Toy Story 4 is in development. It can easily be just in case they ever thought of a good idea for a fourth film that they would have the voice of Buzz on board. It does show, however, that Disney and Pixar were toying with the idea of another Toy Story film. Tom Hanks who will supposed to turn 62 when Toy Story 4 releases has also signed on to reprise his role in case they make Toy Story 4. In June 2011, Tom Hanks said in an interview that “I think they’re working on it right now.” However, John Lasseter says, “We haven’t announced anything, so I can’t really talk about it.” In February 2013, several sites reported that a Toy Story 4 was in production with a release date in 2015. Some sites claimed that Disney and Pixar had confirmed Toy Story 4, but Disney has since denied these rumors saying “Nothing is official”. In the most recent Muppet movie, Muppets Most Wanted, Gonzo mentions (during the “We’re Doing a Sequel” number) that Disney is waiting for Tom Hanks to be available so they can make a Toy Story 4.

The film was originally to be co-directed by John Lasseter, who directed the first two Toy Story films, and Josh Cooley, but at the 2017 D23 Expo, it was announced that Cooley will be the sole director. The basic story is written by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, and Lee Unkrich, with Rashida Jones and Will McCormack turning out the screenplay. The new film will be produced by Galyn Susman.”Toy Story 4″. www.bcdb.com, November 7, 2014

The previous cast is anticipated to return for this fourth film. The original date of release for Toy Story 4 was June 15, 2018

Lasseter said regarding this film:

The Los Angeles Times stated that Lasseter and Stanton have worked on writing a treatment during the last two years.

In March 2015, it is revealed that Josh Cooley, the head of story on Pixar’s Inside Out, had been named the co-director of Toy Story 4.

In October 2015, the original release date was taken by Cars 3, pushing Toy Story 4 by a year to 2018. Disney Announces Release Dates for ‘Incredibles 2,’ ‘Cars 3’ The film was planned for release on June 15, 2018 but was pushed back to June 21, 2019, replacing Incredibles 2. [6]

‘Toy Story 4’: Pixar Threw Out Three Quarters of the Script

Posted on Monday, June 4th, 2018 by Ben Pearson

Toy Story 4 was originally supposed to arrive in theaters in June of 2017, but it swapped release dates with Cars 3 and moved back a year. But it was delayed again, swapping release dates with Incredibles 2 this time and being reassigned to a June 21, 2019 release date.

Now, one of the film’s voice actors has explained the reason for the Toy Story 4 delay: Pixar tossed out 75% of the movie’s script. Read More »

Sequel Bits: ‘Bumblebee’, ‘Frozen 2’, ‘Jurassic World’, ‘It 2’, ‘Creed 2′, The Grudge’ and More

Posted on Friday, April 13th, 2018 by Chris Evangelista

In this edition of Sequel Bits:

  • John Cena says Bumblebeeis going to be good
  • An update on Frozen 2
  • Emily Carmichael discusses Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom and Jurassic World 3
  • Neil Patrick Harris still hopes for a Dr. Horriblesequel
  • Andy Muschietti is ready for It 2
  • Brigette Nielsen might appear in Creed 2
  • A very xtreme poster for Sicario 2
  • An international poster for Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • The Grudge reimagining/sequel gets a release date
  • Toy Story 4also gets a release date

‘Toy Story 4’ Hires New Writer – Could This Movie Still Come Out Next Year?

Posted on Friday, January 19th, 2018 by Chris Evangelista

Toy Story 4 is scheduled to hit theaters next year, but is that even possible at this point? The highly-anticipated sequel has just now added a writer, and depending on how much has to be written for the film, there’s a strong indication that the film might be delayed. More on the new Toy Story 4 writer below.

All Our D23 Coverage, From Pixar to ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ to ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’

Posted on Monday, July 17th, 2017 by Jacob Hall

This past weekend, our own Peter Sciretta journeyed to the 2017 D23 Expo to learn all about the various movies Disney and its many partners will be bringing us over the next few years. We learned the latest on Pixar’s upcoming slate, watched footage from upcoming Disney animation projects, watched teasers for upcoming Disney live-action movies, went behind the scenes of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, watched the first footage from Avengers: Infinity War, and saw all kinds of plans for Disney’s upcoming theme park expansions.


Here is all of our coverage in one place.

John Lasseter No Longer Directing ‘Toy Story 4’ [D23 Expo 2017]

Posted on Friday, July 14th, 2017 by Ben Pearson

Here’s something we didn’t see coming: Pixar’s chief creative officer John Lasseter – who directed the first two movies in the Toy Story franchise – just revealed that he is no longer directing Toy Story 4. Read on to find out the latest about Pixar’s departed Toy Story 4 director.
Read More »

Sequel Bits: ‘War For the Planet of the Apes,’ ‘Toy Story 4,’ ‘Alien: Covenant,’ Bond 25,

Posted on Monday, April 10th, 2017 by Jacob Hall

In this edition of Sequel Bits:

  • Matt Reeves talks about one of the new characters in War For the Planet of the Apes.
  • A weird new poster for Alien: Covenant arrives.
  • Don Rickles had not recorded his lines for Toy Story 4 before he passed away.
  • Mission: Impossible 6 begins filming and adds another actor.
  • Sharknado 5 will debut this summer for some reason.
  • Demian Bichir will star in The Nun.
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales reveals new character posters.
  • Is Jeffrey Wright teasing a Bond 25 role?
  • A series of video teasers for Transformers: The Last Knight.

‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ IMAX Scenes Confirmed in Disney’s New Giant Screen Deal

Posted on Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 by Ethan Anderton

It’s a foregone conclusion that Disney will release almost all of their tentpole titles in the IMAX format, even if they weren’t shot natively on the large format. However, in the case of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, we now know that director Rian Johnson shot some key sequences from the sequel with IMAX cameras, just like J.J. Abrams did for Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

Disney has just announced a new deal with IMAX that includes Star Wars: The Last Jedi being released on the giant screen, along with Star Wars: Episode IX, the Han Solo spin-off that just started production this week, all of the future Marvel Studios releases, and much more. Read More »

‘Toy Story 4’ Delayed Again, ‘The Incredibles 2’ Moved Up

Posted on Wednesday, October 26th, 2016 by Peter Sciretta

Two Pixar films are swapping release dates. Disney has announced that Toy Story 4 has been delayed again, and will be replaced with The Incredibles 2 in the June 2018 release slot. Why is Toy Story 4 delayed? Learn more, after the jump.

Sequel Bits: ‘Toy Story 4,’ ‘Kill Bill Vol. 3,’ ‘XXX 3,’ ‘Zoolander 2’, ‘Fuller House’

Posted on Tuesday, December 8th, 2015 by Jacob Hall

Welcome back to Sequel Bits, that regular feature that’s all about sequels. And their bits. In today’s edition:

  • Quentin Tarantino says Kill Bill Vol. 3could still happen.
  • Tom Hanks offers an update on his Toy Story 4 progress.
  • Tyra Banks is officially back for a Life-Size sequel.
  • Fuller House will address Michelle’s absence.
  • Justin Theroux responds the Zoolander 2 controversies.
  • Vin Diesel finds a leading lady for XXX: The Return of Xander Cage.

Why Pixar Decided To Take ‘Toy Story 4’ In A Different Direction

Posted on Tuesday, November 24th, 2015 by Jacob Hall

Toy Story 3 brought Pixar‘s flagship series to an emotionally resonant and thematically sound conclusion, solidifying the the series’ place as a landmark in modern animation and filmmaking. So let’s just be totally honest here: Toy Story 4 can’t help but feel a little redundant. What else do these characters have to say?

A few new updates on the status of Toy Story 4 have arrived, confirming that this project is still very much in the works and racing toward its 2018 release date. All we can do now is trust that the folks at Pixar (who are still, for the most part, geniuses), have a good reason to bring Buzz, Woody and the gang back to the big screen for another adventure.

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‘Toy Story 4’ Delayed Again, ‘The Incredibles 2’ Moved Up

Posted on Wednesday, October 26th, 2016 by Peter Sciretta

Two Pixar films are swapping release dates. Disney has announced that Toy Story 4 has been delayed again, and will be replaced with The Incredibles 2 in the June 2018 release slot. Why is Toy Story 4 delayed? Learn more, after the jump.

The Incredibles 2 will now hit theaters on June 15th, 2018 while Toy Story 4 will now be released on June 21st, 2019. Disney insiders are saying that the two films are swapping dates “thanks to an accelerated production schedule for Incredibles 2.” However, I personally heard rumblings a few months back to that Pixar was having a little trouble with the production of Toy Story 4, which could be the reason for the delay.

We don’t know much about either project, but we have learned more information about the fourth Toy Story film over the years. We know that John Lasseter, director of the original Toy Story and Toy Story 2, is directing the film, which is set to open a new chapter in the lives of Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and the Toy Story gang.

The story which was dreamt up by Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter and Lee Unkrich, is supposedly focused on a love story, that finds Woody searching for his lost love Bo-Peep, who vanished in between the second and third films. The movie is being co-directed by Josh Cooley, director of the Inside Out short film Riley’s First Date? The film is written by Rashida Jones and Will McCormack.

“We love these characters so much; they are like family to us,” said Lasseter. “We don’t want to do anything with them unless it lives up to or surpasses what’s gone before. Toy Story 3 ended Woody and Buzz’s story with Andy so perfectly that for a long time, we never even talked about doing another Toy Story movie. But when Andrew, Pete, Lee and I came up with this new idea, I just could not stop thinking about it. It was so exciting to me, I knew we had to make this movie—and I wanted to direct it myself.”

This isn’t the first time Toy Story 4 has been delayed. The project was initially announced for a June 17th 2017 release, but last year around this same time, swapped dates with Cars 3. Seems like October is the time when Disney and Pixar execs evaluate their upcoming June releases and make the big decisions. It probably doesn’t help that John Lasseter is splitting his time running the animation studio and Walt Disney Animation while directing this new film.

As for The Incredibles 2, director Brad Bird has been unwilling to reveal any story details.

“It’ll be more Incredibles. I’m not going to give up anything! I come down on the side of surprise,” says Brad Bird.

He most recently teased that the sequel will take the franchise “in some new directions.”

Here is the Pixar release calendar as it stands now:

Cars 3 – June 16, 2017
Coco – November 22, 2017
The Incredibles 2 – June 15, 2018
Toy Story 4 – June 21, 2019
Untitled Pixar Project 1 – March 13, 2020
Untitled Pixar Project 2 – June 19, 2020

According to Pixar president Jim Morris, both untitled projects are stories based on original ideas, not sequels, remakes or adaptations.

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Toy Story 2

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Critics Consensus: The rare sequel that arguably improves on its predecessor, Toy Story 2 uses inventive storytelling, gorgeous animation, and a talented cast to deliver another rich moviegoing experience for all ages.

Critics Consensus: The rare sequel that arguably improves on its predecessor, Toy Story 2 uses inventive storytelling, gorgeous animation, and a talented cast to deliver another rich moviegoing experience for all ages.

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: The rare sequel that arguably improves on its predecessor, Toy Story 2 uses inventive storytelling, gorgeous animation, and a talented cast to deliver another rich moviegoing experience for all ages.

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Critic Reviews for Toy Story 2

No parent who’s been roped into leading the troops to a matinee need fear being bored: gags are, Simpsons-like, conceived to tickle several generations at once.

Toy 2 is colorful and funny, and the computer-animation from Pixar Animation Studios creates a convincingly detailed environment for the toys.

Toy Story 2 is a brilliant example of that rarest of Hollywood phenomena a sequel to a major hit film thats as good, if not better, than the original.

Pixar’s 1995 Toy Story and its superlative 1999 sequel ushered in the supremacy of computer-generated animation.

They’ve done it again. The folks who brought you ‘Toy Story now present Toy Story 2, another clever, riotous tale of life in the toy lane.

Pixar, the animation studio that teamed with Disney for both movies, has broken technological ground since the first Toy Story, and TS2 shows off its newest expertise with one smart visual joke after another.

Filmgoers will need to remind themselves that [the characters were] created by a computer — not exactly a medium we associate with this kind of love, tenderness and care.

It’s a tough act to follow, but director John Lasseter and his Pixar crew have done about as well as can be expected with Toy Story 2.

It’s playtime for viewers of all ages.

Faster, funnier and wilder, with more cunningly contrived computer effects.

As good as Toy Story looks, Toy Story 2 looks even better.

. explores the same themes, but running in place has never seemed as witty, touching and visually engaging as it does here.

Audience Reviews for Toy Story 2

Creating a sequel to a successful and beloved film is hard enough at the best of times. It is even harder to do this when the film in question is not only groundbreaking as a children’s film, but also a key pillar in the history of digital animation. In making a sequel to Toy Story, John Lasseter and his PIXAR team could neither just reproduce the same graphical quality with a different story, nor retell the same story with better production values, a la Evil Dead 2. Any sequel worth its salt would have to do both. This in itself makes it impressive that Toy Story 2 ever got made at all; the original was such a high water mark in animation that it would not have been considered foolish if PIXAR had put up their hands and said “we can’t top this”. But when you take into account both the tortuous production saga before its release and the series’ role as the jewel in PIXAR’s crown, the idea of it being as good if not maybe better than Toy Story shifts from the impressive towards the inconceivable. But here we are, with a sequel which both improves on and compliments the first film, and which is a masterpiece of animation in its own right. I have continually stressed in my reviews the importance of not judging a film by its reputation – whether it comes to us with a bulging entourage of awards, or dragging behind it the stench of negative press. This is, admittedly, very difficult in the internet age, where the amount of information we have to process is inversely proportional to the time which we have to process it before forming opinions. But as I stated in my review of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, the context under which a film was created cannot in and of itself determine whether the film is good or bad: “arguments and constant pressure can produce great creativity, while bonhomie and relaxation can lead to disaster.” Toy Story 2 was originally conceived as a straight-to-video project. With the bulk of the company working on A Bug’s Life, the film remained a small-scale side project for some time – until Disney’s enthusiasm for early rushes in November 1997 led to it getting a theatrical release. What followed was an intense and back-breaking effort to not only finish A Bug’s Life but to reshape and extend Toy Story 2 in time for its release in 1999. Numerous horrifying events befell the PIXAR staff as they raced to meet Disney’s deadline; animators were diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome or repetitive strain injury, one animator’s baby was left in the back seat of his car for a whole morning, and the film was almost lost when one employee accidentally deleted 90% of the files (fortunately, another employee had a backup). The first thing that must be said about Toy Story 2 is that it had no right to be this great given the circumstances under which it was made. It is the animated equivalent of Apocalypse Now, in the sense of being able to pull something terrific out of what to outsiders would seem a total disaster. One could use it as an argument for quick production schedules: what Nicholas Meyer called “short order cooking”, referring to his experience of rewriting Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home mere weeks ahead of shooting. But while the concept of fast production has demonstrated its benefits, this argument both supposes that this was always PIXAR’s intention and implies that liking the film stems merely from admiration at its efficiency, when there is so much more to it than that. For starters, the film’s visual landscape is not only brighter but bigger in scope than the original. There’s a real sense of world-building here, not just to show off the technology but to give a genuine sense of scale to the character’s decisions and accomplishments. The opening sequence alone is sublime, with its deft nods to 2001: A Space Odyssey and 1950s B-movies, but every new location used is beautifully realised with distinctive colours, carefully planned geography and great lighting. This also means that the visual humour has more room to play out, such as the sequence with the traffic cones or the riff on The Empire Strikes Back in the lift. Just like Toy Story itself, the humour and bright visuals of Toy Story 2 serve as the perfect counterpoint to a story which is, if not dark, then very melancholy. Where Toy Story took the concept of toys coming to life and brought the issue of abandonment along for the ride, this is very much a story about fear of the abandonment, ageing and obsolescence. The characters are coming to terms with their own mortality – shelf life, if you will – and have to make difficult decisions about how they should be remembered, and about who has the right to make those decisions. In this respect, there is a comparison with the Harry Potter series, with the outlooks of Harry and Voldemort mirroring those of Woody and Stinky Pete. The latter clings to a dream of immortality; his lack of love in early life leads him to avoid at all costs the long, slow ‘death’ of being in a box or on a shelf, just as Voldemort’s loneliness and inability to love led him to see death as a weakness and cling onto life by any means necessary. Woody, like Harry, comes to accept his limited time on this Earth, saying that he “wouldn’t miss it for the world”, whatever may (or may not) be waiting for him after Andy is too old to play with him. These are deep existential questions to which the film is alluding, showing its different characters’ responses as a way of exploring not just the nature of our masters but how we respond to our time and purpose in life, and who chooses that purpose. It it rare to find this level of intelligence in a children‘s film, and even rarer to find such issues approached so subtly through a great script. The script also makes a good fist of ‘the Buzz Lightyear issue’. The dynamic of Woody and Buzz in Toy Story worked, at least in part, because Buzz’s delusion about his true nature was both funny and humanising; by the time he snapped out of it, they had become firm enough friends to hold the rest together. The problem is this: how do you replicate the stakes of the first film without simply retreading old ground? The two Buzz solution is a very neat way around it, allowing for humour while also spacing out the different parts of the action very nicely. The voice cast in Toy Story 2 is all of the highest calibre. Buzz Lightyear remains the one bright spark in Tim Allen’s largely disappointing filmography, and Tom Hanks is still the perfect match for him as Woody. Newcomers Kelsey Grammer and Joan Cusack are a great deal of fun, with the former drawing on the frustrations present in Frazier to bring a humane darkness to the character. And there’s plenty of good work from John Ratzenberger, Wallace Shawn and the late Don Rickles as Hamm, Rex and Mr Potato Head respectively. Toy Story 2 is a tremendous sequel which remains one of the finest achievements in Western animation, and may be the crowing glory of PIXAR as a studio. John Lasseter’s direction is flawless, supported by a cracking cast, a beautifully written script and visuals which are gorgeous to behold. Whatever the future of the series holds, and whatever PIXAR do in the years to come, this will still stand as one of the best children‘s films ever, as well as one of the late-1990s’ brightest gems.

Even better than the first film, this sequel benefits from the fact that we already know and care about the characters, which is used in favor of a story that is much richer and more profound than the previous one, becoming another instant classic just as well.

The sequel to the big computer animated landmark success does everything right. It keeps the characters that made the original a hit and gives them depth, new adversaries, friends and dilemmas. That’s as heart-warming as hilariously funny, with even more great jokes, movie references and racy action sequences than the first film. The writing is perfect, always pushing the right buttons at the right time, switching from emotional to funny scenes without effort. Just try to keep your eyes dry during Jessie’s song. It’s also amazing what technical progress this film brings to the table, especially compared to its predecessor. As a rare example of a sequel that easily surpasses its original in every aspect, it is still a beauty to watch 13 years later, makes you laugh, cry and stand in awe of the perfection delivered here. Probably the best animated film ever made.

The sequel provides more laughter and satisfaction with the introduction to new characters and new story. Toy Story 2, although may not be topple it’s original, still provides for a fantastic flick for the entire family to enjoy. 5/5


Toy Story 4 Trailer – 2018


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